WHEN IT’S NOT JUST YOUR RV’S WHEELS THAT ARE SPINNING

Full article reading time excluding linked videos about 15-20 minutes.

IMAGINE: you wake up in the morning and as you get out of bed all of a sudden the room starts spinning violently; it’s nothing but a whirling blur. You can’t tell up from down, left from right. You have the sensation that you are being pushed over and pulled toward the floor. You lose your balance fall. From your position on the floor, or bed if you were lucky enough to fall in that direction and not split your skull open on some piece of furniture on the way to the floor, you see the room whirling around you, jerking back and forth violently as it does, and you’re nauseated. Your world is completely out of control, a swirling blur to your eyes and you just want it to stop. This is perhaps the worst and most frightening feeling you’ve ever had. “Make it stop, please God make it stop!” you think to yourself. Luckily, in a minute it does…but only until you begin to move again. “What’s wrong with me? Is it an infection, a stroke, a brain tumor?” These are things that may cross your mind.

What you have just experienced is called vertigo. Something like 40% of people will experience vertigo at least once during their lifetime. One study published on the National Institutes of Health web site suggests that about 73% of BPPV cases affect those between the ages of 31-60 which of course makes up a large percentage of RVers. While it’s not painful it’s one of the worst feelings and most frightening experiences a person can have. I know. I just lived it.

It’s bad enough when this happens at home, but when you’re on the road in your RV where medical care may be more difficult to obtain, the surroundings and medical personnel unfamiliar, it presents an even more worrisome situation.

Since many RVers are likely to run into this problem I thought an article about it might be of some interest and importance by way of a providing framework to cope should the situation arise. [READ MORE…]

PROSSER FAMILY CAMPGROUND, TRUCKEE, CA

Prosser Family Campground
In order to fit into campsite 23 completely it was necessary to park the pickup at an angle in front of the fifth wheel.

With 29 campsites Prosser Family Campground, A.K.A. Prosser Campground, not to be confused with Prosser Ranch Group Campground next door, is a small, Forest Service campground in Truckee, CA which is in the Sierra Nevada mountains at an elevation of nearly 6,000′. It is set amidst tall pine trees which create quite a bit of shade for most campsites, yet some sites get enough sun to allow solar equipped RVs such as ours to generate enough power so as to be able to avoid running generators (except to run air-conditioners). Typical, summer, Sierra mountain weather with temps in the 70s and 80s and low humidity would make that seem a less likely scenario. We experienced a heat wave the last time we were in Truckee with temps up to 90º or so and while it was quite warm in the RV we got by with running our Fan-Tastic fans without running the dreaded generators. (These roof-vent fans have multiple speeds, thermostats, rain sensors that close the lids automatically, remote controls, and airflow can be reversed at the push of a button so with one blowing in and one blowing out you can establish a circulation pattern through the RV.) [READ MORE…]

CAMPGROUND REPORT: FRENCH CAMP RV PARK, MANTECA, CA

Squeezed into site 117 at French Camp
Squeezed into site 117 at French Camp

We stayed at French Camp for one night as it seemed the best option for us as we were passing through from the Sequoia-Kings Canyon area on our way to Truckee, CA. Others may have made that drive in one day but we don’t like to travel for as long as that would require. Knowing that we would be coming from a week of boondocking and passing through California’s San Joaquin Valley which is often quite hot in the summer knew we wanted full hookups in order to have air-conditioning; empty our black and gray tanks, fill up on fresh water as we were headed to a campground without hookups, and to enjoy some nice long showers. [READ MORE…]

ARCTIC FOX 29-5T FIFTH WHEEL USER REPORT – REVIEW

Milo McGiver State Park Campground
Our first campsite ever in our new 2018 Arctic Fox 29-5T: Milo McGiver State Park in Oregon. What a beautiful place.

This post is just to let you know that I have just published a User Report about the Arctic Fox 29-5T fifth wheel travel trailer. I am not including the report in in my blog email update simply because it is much too long and might be a bore for disinterested readers. Truth be told, there are numerous tidbits of information within the report that may be valuable for any RVer or would-be RVer. Even so, I will let people who are interested click through to the report.

I will, in brief, say that in general, when I write a User Report that’s what it is, a user report, not a fluff piece that simply quotes a manufacturer’s literature or points you to a page where I can profit from you making a purchase. It’s based on actual experience. After 6 years of RVing experience and having lived in RVs for something akin to three years I may be in a better position to tell you about things from the perspective of an RV owner than many if not most RV salespeople or manufacturers.

Within the report I compare the 2018 model year I own to the current 2020 unit pointing out some changes, some small and some large. I also make some comments more reflective on the RV industry as a whole. If you are considering the purchase of an Arctic Fox 29-5T I would consider my report a must-read. I also think there is useful information within the report for anybody considering the purchase of any RV. Hopefully, anybody who reads the report for any reason will find something of value.

Lupine Leaves

Lupine
Lupine leaves with raindrops. This image is copyrighted property and may be used only as specified: Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

I remember making this photo. It was exhausting. Not because I spent hours lighting and shooting dozens of frames from different angles to make a focus stacking shot. Unlike my studio flower shots this one was made outdoors, with natural light, with one exposure: click…done.

While walking I came across some lupines in a neighborhood garden shortly after a rain shower. The little beads of water on the leaves really caught my eye. Click or tap to enlarge and you’ll see what I mean. I knew the droplets wouldn’t last, that they would soon dry up. I was maybe a half mile from home which is where my camera was at the time. I knew if I was to be able to catch the droplets before they dried up I was going to have to get some exercise…and so I ran home to snatch up my tripod and camera.

Water Lily

WaterLily
This top down view of a water lily was made from five photos using the focus stacking technique. This image is copyrighted property and may be used only as specified: Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

This is another view of a water lily. I posted another view of the same flower recently, here. I don’t recall shooting the flower, but I can see I shot five photos from which I made this photo using the focus-stacking technique.

I’m not sure I mentioned it before…in case I haven’t I recently made a gallery with some of my flower photos which makes it easy to click through them one after the other. Find it here.

ANEMONE

This close-up of an anemone always makes me feel like it’s looking back at me. This image is copyrighted property and may be used only as specified: Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

I do not recall photographing this anemone and I’m not near the original photo of it at the moment in order to be able to check: although I’m pretty sure I used the focus-stacking technique to produce this image I cannot at the moment say how many photos were used in creating it.

The anthers on the outside are covered with a blue pollen while those nearer the center are more of a yellow color because they have not yet developed theirs. That’s my guess, anyway.

Besides its striking color and appearance I always think of this flower as a hairy eyeball. That’s maybe kind of a little creepy, but there you have it.

GODETIA

Pink Godetia
Pink Godetia, made from a stack of 27 photographs utilizing the focus-stacking technique. Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

This blog has grown to the point where I don’t remember half the things I’ve already posted. That’s not usually a problem but sometimes I find myself uploading a photo that’s already in my media library. I did that just the other day with the shot of broccoli Romanesco, and I almost did it again with this shot of a lovely godetia.

I want to say that this is one of my very favorite photos but it seems I have been saying that a lot lately. I guess I have a lot of favorites. I suppose that’s fair because I’m sure I’ve taken millions of photos over the years–I think I’m entitled to a few hundred favorites.

This flower came home with me from a local flower shop and I set about photographing it a number of different ways. I love the gentle gradations of color, the folds with delicate interplay of light and shadow. It seems soft and inviting to me, as if I could walk into the photo and snuggle up amidst the petals for a little nap.

This image was made from a stack of 27 separate photos using the focus-stacking technique.

ASCLEPIAS

Asclepias
Asclepias, or milkweeds, produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity. Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

I have no recollection of photographing this flower. Maybe it’s because I photographed it 10 years ago. Maybe it’s because I just had a beer. Either way, I came across this image as I was rummaging through my archives of flower photos for something to post in order to offer some entertainment.

Just as I didn’t recall shooting this flower I also didn’t recall knowing anything about it so I did a quick Google and learned from the Wikipedia page it’s a milkweed and “members of the genus Asclepias produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity.  Five petals reflex backwards revealing a gynostegium (fused stamen filaments and styles) surrounded by a five-membrane corona. The corona is composed of a five paired hood and horn structure with the hood acting as a sheath for the inner horn. Glands holding pollinia are found between the hoods. The size, shape and color of the horns and hoods are often important identifying characteristics for species in the genus Asclepias.” That’s TMI for me. I just enjoy looking at the photo.

This image was made from 17 separate photographs using the focus-stacking technique.

BLUSHING BRIDE PROTEA

Blushing Bride Protea
I wouldn’t be surprised if the blushing bride protea got its name its delicate, pink petals. Feel free to use this photo on your personal devices for personal, private, non business uses. If you wish to share this photo or others I may post please do so only by using any Share buttons that may be available on the page or by providing the page URL to those with whom you wish to share. Thank you.

Very different in appearance than the pincushion protea, this blushing bride protea has the most delicate, translucent, pink petals and a very soft appearance created not only by it’s petals and coloring but by its feathery filaments (more obvious in the photo below).

I found this blossom at a local florist and took it home to shoot in my living room studio. I used the focus stacking technique, combining seven separate photos into the image you see above. For the image you see below, 17 photos comprised the stack. Retouching, however, took much, much longer than the shooting because of the artifacts created by the focus stacking technique–when a lot of photos go into the stack more artifacts tend to be created, especially where there is a lot of fine detail.

Blushing Bride Protea
Shooting this delicate blushing bride protea took but a fraction of the time it took to retouch out the artifacts created by the focus stacking process.

RVing America

HandyBob's Blog

Making off grid RV electrical systems work

Wheeling It: Tales From a Nomadic Life

On the Road Since 2010, Traveling Across USA & Europe With 12 Paws

Live Laugh RV

Our Next Chapter

%d bloggers like this: